So you want to be more powerful...

Hi everyone, Donogh here again and this time I’m going to tell you how you can get more powerful without learning the Olympic lifts. What??? But how?? Just listen 😉

Olympic lifts are excellent for power output, research has shown us that. But from my experiences with teams, the time taken to teach the technique eats in to a lot of time where you can be getting faster or more powerful or doing curls 😊

When we train for power, what we are essentially looking for is big extension through the hips and glutes and explosive power right up from the ankles which we call triple extension. Improvements in power will come by moving weight very very fast.

These are 4 exercises that I recommend for power that are easy to do and come very close to Olympic lifts for power output.

1.       Loaded Squat Jump – The most similar exercise to an Olympic lift without the complications. I like to hold 2 dumbbells by my side weighing about 40% of my body weight. Get into a quarter squat and jump as high as possible. This exercise gets you into a similar triple extension as the Olympic lift but eliminates the catch. You still produce a lot of power and when landing correctly you receive force too which is crucial for contact sports. Very simple to do and I would recommend 3-4 reps, 3-4 sets with about 90 second rest between sets.

2.       Prowler Push – This exercise when done correctly can produce great amounts of force. You can do this exercise 2 ways, pushing off one leg at a time like a running motion or 2 legs at a time. Either way you will want to ensure that you push your legs back as far as you can to get into that triple extension. I personally like pushing off 2 legs explosively driving the prowler away from you and ending up lying face down on the floor in a push up position (just remember to put your hands out as you fall). I would recommend 50-60% of your body weight and about 10-15m of reps and 3-4 sets again with about 90 seconds rest.

3.       Hip Thrust – Research has suggested that hip thrusts can increase your vertical and horizontal jumps while decreasing your 10m and 20m sprint time. If that’s not a reason to be doing this exercise more than I don’t know what is. I would recommend working at around 70-75% of your 1 rep max and moving the bar as fast as possible getting into hip extension. Again 3-4 reps and 3-4 sets would work well with about 90 seconds rest.

4.       Kneeling Med Ball Wall Slam – This exercise works on upper and lower body. The key to making this exercise worth adding in to your power program is exploding through the hips as you throw the ball and again ending up lying face down on the ground. This will work on extension through the hips and power through the upper body. 4-5 reps and 3-4 sets with around 90 seconds rest will be enough.

So that’s 4 great exercises to add to your program to get more powerful which will lead to increases in your speed and in your jump. And who doesn’t want that?

Here at PFP we have a jump mat that can give an accurate measurement of jump height and speed gates that give an accurate measurement of speed. So why not call in and test yourself before trying these out and then re test after 4 weeks to see if they work.

As always, if you have any questions pop in and ask or leave a comment underneath.

Talk soon

Donogh

 

Bad Hamstrings?...Our top tips...

Hi everyone,

Coach Ev here again.

This blog post is aimed towards those who complain of having ‘’Bad Hamstrings’’, and who are wondering how they can fix this. 

 

Here are my 4 tops tips for developing and strengthening those hamstrings.

1)      Flexibility

This is a simple one, you don’t need much on this and there are many ways you can work on hamstring flexibility. Here at PFP we keep it simple with toe touch progressions and leg lowers. For the toe touch progression. Start with your knees straight and feet hip width apart, toes elevated (on a rope or small block of wood), and in a controlled manner walk your fingers down your legs, then try with heels elevated. Again, keeping it simple can be most effective. With leg lowers all you need is a band or piece of rope, lie back on the ground with the end of the rope etc wrapped around one foot keeping your leg elevated but knee straight. Raise the other leg to the same to the same angle as the leg being held by the rope. Even at home using static hold stretches can help. However, before a gym/pitch/class session I would strongly recommend using more dynamic movements.

 

2)      Mobility

It may not be your hamstrings that are the problem but rather poor mobility or movement from the ankle or hip. Working on simple mobility exercises can aid in the movement in these joints thus helping the hamstring lengthen. For ankles, I would always recommend a simple exercise known as ‘’knee to wall’’. Where you place one knee on the ground, like a lunge position, keep your front heel flat and press your knee forward. Over time you’ll find you’ll get further and further away from the wall. For hip mobility, the list is almost endless ranging from goblet squats to front foot elevated split squats to fire hydrants and to more lateral squats.

 

3)      Glute Activation

Poor glute activation is often a factor when athletes or gym goes complain of tight or sore hamstrings. Mini bands are an easy and effective method of activating the glutes in a warm up and go a long way to rectifying the problem. Getting a band around the knees and working on walks, clams and side lying leg raises will guarantee those glute are firing, in addition work on glute bridges and hip thrusts.

 

4)      Eccentric Strength

(Eccentric strength has been highly backed up by research as a valuable tool in preventing hamstring strains. Eccentric strength is where you slow down the lowering portion of a rep e.g. RDL deadlift with a 5 sec lowering on a rep and then explode up)

RDLs!! Nordic Curls! And Glute Ham Raises!

Using tempo work for these can put the muscle under eccentric tension. For an RDL or Romanian deadlift, I would use at least 3 seconds eccentricly or on the way down. This puts the muscle under tension whilst lengthening it. Having good eccentric strength aids in reducing your chance of injury but for athletes also helps with deceleration during speed and agility work.

So, there’s my top tips for helping those dodgey hammys. Any questions as always call into PFP or give us a shout.

Ev Hennessy B.Sc