My top tips for gains..i.e. Hypertrophy

Your training is going to plan and you want to dial in your nutrition to make some GAINS! If your goal is to gain lean muscle mass, you'll know that getting calories in can be hard at times, especially hitting that protein target. 

  • First thing is liquid calories..easy to get in, easy to digest. Things like milk, smoothies etc. can be had on the go and don't require any planning. With your smoothie, through in a scoop of protein or two, berries /banana /avocado, nut butter, ice, use milk as your liquid to increase cals and protein. 
Image via pinterest

Image via pinterest

  • If you've no intolerances then you can up your intake of grains, especially on days when your carbs are higher.  
  • Don't leave majority of your calories until the afternoon/evening, for me it works well to spread it out throughout the day. If I leave it too late, it can impact on sleep and just leave me feeling a bit sluggish.
  • Eat protein in the morning - I find if I eat a good bit of protein in the morning then it's much easier to hit target for the day. It can happen quite easily that you don't have much protein in the morning, especially if you just have something like oats, and really it's like fighting a losing battle, on the protein front, for the rest of the day. So try include eggs, turkey rashers, protein in oats, salmon on brown bread, protein smoothie, greek yogurt etc. in your first meal. 
Image via Pinterest

Image via Pinterest

  • Don't be too fussy about food sources, sometimes you just have to get the calories in even if it's not the most nutrient dense food. 
  • And my last tip is don't increase your calories too quickly - to reduce the chance of putting on fat tissue you need to be very controlled in your pace of increasing calories. 

The Great Protein Debate

Protein is gaining a lot of attention these days – so much so that marketers are desperately jumping on the bandwagon and throwing “a source of protein” on pretty much everything that you can eat – an example below shows a desperate attempt at it. (Image provided by Joseph Agu @ Elite Nutrition Coaching). 

 

Our bodies use protein to make some fundamental molecules – like enzymes, hormones, neurotransmitters, and antibodies, as well as helping build muscle and replace and repair damaged cells, meaning our bodies don’t function all that well without adequate protein.

When blood sugar levels are low, for example during and after exercise, or in between meals, a hormone called glucagon is released, which causes the liver to breakdown any stored energy, meaning glucagon can help breakdown body fat. Consuming adequate amounts of protein can help increase levels of this hormone.

Recent media reports have tried to suggest that too much protein can cause organ damage or increase cancer risks. These concerns are typically overblown and here are some recent studies to support the fact that protein does not damage organs or cause cancer.

http://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12970-016-0114-2   

http://www.lookgreatnaked.com/blog/new-study-on-protein-overfeeding-a-critical-analysis/

To clarify, people with certain medical conditions may not be advised to consume too much protein, but all excessive protein will do to a healthy person is give them a dose of wallet ache. This has stemmed from the fact that people with kidney issues respond well to a lower protein intake, but this leads to people taking a reverse causality approach, whereby they see that a lower protein intake helps those with kidney dysfunction, so high protein intake must have caused the kidney dysfunction, this however, is far from the truth.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17383270

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17383270    

Protein Intake recommendations

Your daily protein intake is largely dependent on your goals and activity level: Some recommendations will say that 0.5g/lb of body weight is sufficient, but this recommendation is purely based on avoiding a deficiency. Therefore, in order to get the benefits mentioned previously, you need more to thrive!

0.8 - 1g/lb body weight if your weight is stable and you don’t exercise

1.0-1.2 g/lb if your goal is fat loss and you’re physically active

1.2 - 1.5 g/lb if your goal is muscle building and you're physically active

People who are overweight or obese should calculate their daily protein intake based on their target weight as opposed to their existing body weight, as going off your current weight could result in consuming too many calories.

Gaining Weight or “Bulking”

Bulking and weight gain doesn’t require a massive increase to your protein intake, provided this intake is adequate. Muscle growth is affected by protein availability and protein elimination rates, or how fast protein is used up. Muscle tissue is constantly going through a process of breaking down and restoration – training and eating are the biggest contributors that will determine whether or not your body breaks down muscle tissue more or builds it up more – as you can probably guess, if you’re eating more food and hitting your protein intake, then you will sway towards the side of muscle building and not muscle breakdown.

The more calories the body has available to it, the more efficiently it utilizes protein because fewer amino acids are converted into glucose. This means that the added calories are contributing toward more efficient protein use, so there may not be a need to increase protein intake during a “bulking period”, once you are consuming an adequate amount in the first place.   

Moreover, since protein has a high thermic effect, (burns calories through the process of digestion) than carbs and fat, it might not be in the best interest of someone looking to put on weight to consume more protein than they need to, when the extra calories could go towards carbs or fats, which won’t burn up valuable calories in the digestion process.

Thermic Effect of Food in %

  • Protein: 20-35% of calories burned through digestion.
  • Carbohydrates: 5-10% of calories burned through digestion.
  • Fats: 0-5% of calories burned through digestion.

Sources of Protein

Protein sources do not matter much when we are just talking about protein, however, they matter in the context of the overall diet. For example, eating a high calorie protein source means a lot of calories are taken up, calories which could be directed elsewhere. If looking to lose weight, then choosing lean sources of protein can help keep calorie count low.

Protein from both plant and animal sources work just as well as each other in terms of increasing protein synthesis. The amino acid Leucine seems to be a major contributor to muscle protein synthesis – which can be found in eggs, poultry, milk, fish and meat.

Supplementation

People who cannot eat enough protein due to finances, diet preferences, or motivation often turn to supplementation to avoid eating more chicken or eggs! Others, however, seem to think that protein comes only in powder form and in a shaker bottle.

Mainstream media and supplement companies have tried to over complicate protein intakes because it helps sell products. There is only one advantage a protein shake has over protein from real whole foods and that’s convenience.  If you’re stuck for time then a protein shake is your biggest ally, although the new protein milk is a great source of protein plus other vitamins and minerals. 

Don’t feel under pressure to shell out on protein supplements or even stick to drinking them if they cause stomach discomfort (which many people complain of). Try getting your protein from whole sources of food and use the protein shakes for convenience, (if you are going to use them).  Supplementation should only be used if dietary changes cannot be made to meet your protein requirements. It is however, worth noting that consuming protein in the form of actual food can give benefits that supplementation may not be able to provide.

Summary

The debate over “optimal” protein intake is likely to continue for decades to come, as research continues to evolve, however the intakes recommended above are reasonably accurate and pose no health risks to healthy populations. Sources of protein are generally well known, however, be careful of marketers jumping on the bandwagon and read food labels to ensure you know what you are consuming. Use supplements for convenience and don’t view them as a staple. 

Thanks for reading guys - as always if you have any specific questions give us a shout.

Adam

S & C Coach

PFP GYM

Counting Macros...Free PFP Talk

Just a short blog post today to give you a bit of an idea of what the Macro 101 talk will be about.

In case you haven't heard there is a FREE talk in PFP gym on Tuesday 28th June at 8:30pm - 9:30pm. The talk is open to everyone, not just PFP gym members. There will be two topics discussed on the night - Macros and Hip Mobility for increased strength.

I will be delivering the Macro talk and just want to give you a better idea of what I will be talking about on the night; so here are 3 reasons why you should count your macros -

1. To make yourself more knowledgeable about what foods have more calories / less calories, more /less protein, fats, minerals, vitamins etc. By doing this you can ultimately put yourself in a position to make better choices - knowledge is power!!

2. If you're already eating a healthy diet and have lost body fat and /or gained muscle mass and you want to take your progress (nutrition, body composition) to the next level, then counting your macros is a massive tool in helping you to do this. It's super easy - I use 'My Fitness Pal', which allows me to scan any food with a barcode and record it with all macronutrients broken down automatically  i.e. carbs, protein fats, vitamins, minerals etc. . If there's no barcode I can weigh it out and manually put the food in to the app - which the app will then break down into the macronutrients. Once I have manually put in a food /recipe it is in my app forever - this makes it easier the next time you use that food.

3. Using an app to track food makes you more accountable for your actions - you'll hesitate to eat foods that will take you over your daily macro requirements. On the other hand, if you're not tracking macros you are more likely to have for example,  3-4 biscuits with your tea because you probably haven't really got an idea of how much you've eaten already that day or of how many calories /macros you have left.

I hope that you found that interesting!! The talk on 28th June will include a lot more information including  how to break down your own macro requirements for your own goals - this has been highly requested so I am looking forward to giving people the tools to work out their own macros!!

Details for the talk are : PFP GYM - Tuesday 28th June - 8:30pm - 9:30pm - FREE

In meantime, if you have any specific questions that you want answered then let me know and I will do my best to answer them on the night.

Nigel