How to improve your conditioning levels...

Hi everyone, Donogh here from PFP. In this blog I am going to focus on how to increase fitness or conditioning. We have wrote quite extensively in the past via blogs or on our social media about various ways to improve strength through differing methods, exercises or rep schemes, so now it’s time to talk about conditioning. This is quite a broad topic that I will try to make as simple as possible but due to the vastness of the topic, I will split it into 2 parts.

When training to improve conditioning, you are effectively training the heart. You are trying to train the heart to be able to pump blood around the body fast enough to maintain the activity you are doing (walking, working, training etc.). When designing a conditioning programme, coaches need to know the ultimate goal of the person. In this blog, the focus will be on the person who is looking to improve their lifestyle.

When training to improve conditioning, you are effectively training the heart. You are trying to train the heart to be able to pump blood around the body fast enough to maintain the activity you are doing (walking, working, training etc.). When designing a conditioning programme, coaches need to know the ultimate goal of the person. In this blog, the focus will be on the person who is looking to improve their lifestyle.

Improving your conditioning, much like improving strength, can be done in a variety of ways. The first thing that you need to ask yourself is what exactly you want to improve. Do you want to improve it to play your sport? Is it to improve your quality of life? For example, you struggle to do everyday tasks due to a lack of fitness.

In this scenario, it is likely that adding conditioning exercises at the end of a structured weights programme will help them. We would recommend a form of high intensity interval training. This will usually last up to 15 minutes with interspersed breaks throughout some high intensity exercise, for example: prowler pushes.

Here at PFP, we try to incorporate weights training into all programmes as we believe this is the most efficient way to lose body fat or gain muscle. Increasing your conditioning levels can have a direct impact on the amount of weights training you can do. If your heart is capable of pumping blood around your body at an efficient rate, it will allow you to recover optimally between sets.

If weight training isn’t your thing, and you still would like to improve your conditioning levels, a combination of low intensity steady state training and high intensity training can be a good way to reach your goals. This could be done by going for a brisk walk, slow jog, consistent speed cycling or rowing where you can keep a steady heart rate at around 120-140 beats per minute (this will vary depending on age and fitness levels). Perform this steady state training for 20-60 minutes to improve your hearts ability to pump blood around the body.

 Note: The time above varies quite alot again based on age and fitness levels, you could also go longer than an hour.

Combine this training with some sort of high intensity training on different days with exercises such as burpees, sprints, jumping jacks, mountain climbers etc. for a better conditioning regime that will provide the heart with a different stimulus to improve its function. Try following a time on, time off ratio where you do more work than you rest, for example: 20 seconds on, 10 seconds off.

Hopefully, after reading the above you’ll have a bit more of an understanding on how to improve your conditioning levels. If you are looking to improve your conditioning for sport, stay tuned for our next blog.

Thanks,

Donogh

 

Sleep...your secret weapon!

“Sleep is food for the brain, sleep is fuel for exercise”

Hi everyone, Donogh here from PFP. In this blog I’m going to discuss the importance of sleep and how you might be able to improve your sleep – your secret weapon!

Sleep can aid the body in growth and repair as cortisol, a known muscle eater is reduced during sleep. Sleep is the best time for growth and repair as testosterone and human growth hormone are at their peak. A reduction in sleep means a reduction in muscle building time. Long periods without sleep can increase stress to key organs and cause muscle soreness. Sleep has been shown to improve motor learning and reduce anxiety. Research has even shown that 8+ hours of sleep can reduce your risk of injury.

Image via Pinterest

Image via Pinterest

 

So, what are the consequences of poor sleeping patterns?

•       Poor concentration, Poor Decision Making, Poor memory Recall

•       Mood Disturbance, Increased Anxiety, Depression,

•       Reduced Testosterone, Reduced Growth Hormone, Increased Cortisol, Reduced natural adrenal release

•       Increased risk of illness

•       Loss in Lean Tissue, Increase in Body Fat

•       Increase stress to key organs

Did you know that research has also shown that being awake constantly for 17 hours has the same effect as 0.05% blood alcohol levels! To avoid this effect, it is advised to try nap throughout the day if you have a long day. A 20 minute nap has been shown to enhance alertness, concentration and motor skills. Be careful not to nap too long though as naps between 45min and 90min may have you waking up groggy and disoriented.

What strategies can we implement to try sleep better?

  • Educate – Understand the importance sleep plays in your lifestyle
  • Routine – Determine your sleep requirements and meet them nightly, try go to bed around the same time every night
  • Environment – Create a dark, quiet, comfortable and a technology free bedroom. Avoid using your phone, tablet or laptop 1 hour prior to going to sleep. Activate the blue light filter on your phone/tablet. Or try out the blue light blocking glasses - available here
  • Periodize Sleep – Try creating times within busy days that you can have a nap
  • Nutrition – Stabilize blood sugar levels, restrict caffeine consumption after 3pm so your bodies melatonin production isn’t interrupted

Sleep is one of the most underappreciated part of our lifestyle but it can play a huge role in helping us reach our goals. Hopefully from this you can take away how important it is and try to improve it just a little.

As always, if you have any questions just pop in and ask one of us.

Talk to ye soon,

Donogh

How to get the most from your gym experience...

Hi everyone, Coach Ev here at PFP.

Whether you’re an athlete, fitness fanatic or new to the gym life, getting the most from your experience is vital in order to keep you motivated and help you achieve your goals.

So here are my recommendations to help you get the most from your experience.

1)      Research

Gyms are not one size fits all. There are many different gyms out there to cater for various needs. Finding the right gym for you is vital for your success. Choosing the right gym can seem like a difficult task. Do some research on them. Check out their website. Make an appointment to come in and chat with the staff about your goals. Some gyms cater specifically for weight training, fitness based classes, personal training, Powerlifting, Olympic Lifting, team conditioning or even pay as you go. (FYI - PFP Gym caters for all of the aforementioned!)  The gym you choose will determine the experience you have. And this really can be the difference between you achieving your goals and giving up. Talk to the staff and get the blunt facts! Find out what each place offers and what qualifications and experience the staff have. 

 

2)      Goals

Set yourself both long and short term goals. Make sure that your goals are SMART - specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and  time based. An example of poor goal setting is - 'I want to squat more', 'I want to be thin', 'I want to get fit' - none of these are SMART. How will you ever know if you have achieved your goal? You won't! Goals like these set the individual up for failure and they end up giving up. Good goal setting might sound like the following 'I want to squat 5kg more in 4 weeks time', 'I want to lose 10 lbs in 8 weeks' or 'I want to run 10km without stopping by the end of the year'. Be mindful of your goals. Think about what you really want to achieve. Be realistic. And reflect every so often to assess how you are progressing towards the goal. 

 

3)      Get yourself a diary

A great way to see real improvements is to get yourself a diary. Write in everything you eat and the times you eat at, your work schedule, training schedule and how your mood is from day to day. Yes, I know it’s quite a bit to keep track of, but you’ll clearly be able see if eating certain things impact your mood/ training/ work state. This will help to keep you motivated and it can help to determine any nutrition issues. Another benefit of a food diary is the accountability factor - seeing what you are eating in black and white can be an eye-opener for some people. The fact that you are recording everything that you eat means you are less likely to eat mindlessly throughout the day.  If writing down everything isn't your thing, there are plenty of apps that allow you to record food intake online.  

 

4)      Feedback

Don't be afraid to ask questions when training. A good coach will not only explain how to do something, but will also explain WHY you are doing it. Learn about different exercises and build your own knowledge.  From time to time, your coach may need to alter your program based on your physical capabilities. This is done to ensure that you are getting the most from your training. Be ready for your coach to correct your form - it's not a criticism! Good form is crucial to prevent injury and to make sure you are getting the most form your session. 

So, those are some of my tips when trying to get the most out of your gym experience. Any questions don’t be afraid call in and ask.

Ev Hennessy B.Sc

Personal trainer/ Strength and Conditioning Coach

 

Can exercise help you beat anxiety?

We all know how good working out is for our physical health, so let's start a conversation today about the benefits of working out for your mental health. 

Image via Pinterest

Image via Pinterest

Exercise is underutilized as a method of managing and treating anxiety. It has no negative side-effects and it can be free, if you do it at home or outside.

Several studies have shown that there is a very powerful connection between exercise and anxiety. In fact, the coloration between both is so strong, that exercise on its own may be enough to drastically diminish the symptoms of anxiety. 

How can exercise do this?

1. Endorphins - the body releases endorphins when you exercise. These are your body's natural 'painkillers',  and in addition they play a massive role in regulating your mood and relaxing your mind. You know that 'feel good' feeling after a workout ? Yep! That's the endorphins. 

2. Sleep - exercise tires out the body and  can enable those who have anxiety to get a better night's sleep. A lack of sleep, or inability to sleep, makes the symptoms of anxiety worse. Exercise can release all of the excess energy in the body and mind - in fact, high intensity exercise has been shown to tire out the body and the mind simultaneously. 

3. Inactivity anxiety - a lack of exercise can lead to an excess of energy and this energy can be misplaced by the body, resulting in increased tension and stress. An increase in stress levels can exacerbate anxiety. This is very much linked with the above point on sleep. A lack activity can feed into a lack of sleep, and together both of these elements can accumulate and worsen the symptoms of anxiety. 

4. Healthy coping strategy- managing anxiety through exercise is a healthy coping strategy. Sometimes we turn to things like alcohol to manage anxiety. But the consumption of alcohol, as a coping strategy,  will usually have a negative impact on anxiety and will often lead to a worsening of symptoms. Exercise, on the other hand, is a positive means of dealing with anxiety with lots of additional benefits such as improved overall health. If you are in a gym or a group, such as a running group, the camaraderie and friendships can be an additional support in managing anxiety.

So that's it - a brief overview of how exercise can help to cope with and manage anxiety. In the long term, a regular exercise schedule can dramatically alleviate the symptoms of anxiety. If you, or someone you know, is suffering with anxiety, please do seek medial advice - medication is may sometimes be necessary, but exercise can, and should, compliment it.

As always, feel free to get in touch,

Nigel

If you need to talk to someone please phone one of the numbers below:

Aware (Depression, Bi-Polar Disorder & Anxiety)

www.aware.ie
Tel: 1800 80 48 48

National Suicide Helpline (Pieta House)
1800 247 247

Pieta House (Suicide & Self-harm)

www.pieta.ie
Tel: 01 623 5606

Grow (Mental Health support and Recovery)

www.grow.ie
Tel: 1890 474 474

IACP (Counselling & Psychotherapy)

www.iacp.ie
Tel: 01 230 3536

Shine (Supporting people effected by mental ill health)

www.shine.ie
Tel: 01 860 1620

Teenline Ireland Helpline

www.teenireland.ie
1800 833 634

For references and further info please see below :

Exercise for Mood and Anxiety, Proven Strategies for Overcoming Depression and Enhancing Well-Being, by Michael W. Otto, PhD, and Jasper A.J. Smits, PhD (Oxford University Press, 2011)

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201506/sitting-all-day-increases-your-risk-anxiety

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201504/mindfulness-the-power-thinking-about-your-thinking

http://www.calmclinic.com/anxiety/treatment/exercising