My top tips for gains..i.e. Hypertrophy

Your training is going to plan and you want to dial in your nutrition to make some GAINS! If your goal is to gain lean muscle mass, you'll know that getting calories in can be hard at times, especially hitting that protein target. 

  • First thing is liquid calories..easy to get in, easy to digest. Things like milk, smoothies etc. can be had on the go and don't require any planning. With your smoothie, through in a scoop of protein or two, berries /banana /avocado, nut butter, ice, use milk as your liquid to increase cals and protein. 
Image via pinterest

Image via pinterest

  • If you've no intolerances then you can up your intake of grains, especially on days when your carbs are higher.  
  • Don't leave majority of your calories until the afternoon/evening, for me it works well to spread it out throughout the day. If I leave it too late, it can impact on sleep and just leave me feeling a bit sluggish.
  • Eat protein in the morning - I find if I eat a good bit of protein in the morning then it's much easier to hit target for the day. It can happen quite easily that you don't have much protein in the morning, especially if you just have something like oats, and really it's like fighting a losing battle, on the protein front, for the rest of the day. So try include eggs, turkey rashers, protein in oats, salmon on brown bread, protein smoothie, greek yogurt etc. in your first meal. 
Image via Pinterest

Image via Pinterest

  • Don't be too fussy about food sources, sometimes you just have to get the calories in even if it's not the most nutrient dense food. 
  • And my last tip is don't increase your calories too quickly - to reduce the chance of putting on fat tissue you need to be very controlled in your pace of increasing calories. 

Low calorie treats - my top 5!

Calories in versus calories out is the most important element when it comes to fat loss, everything else - macros, supplements, training, sleep etc. - comes after this. The bottom line is that if you eat excess calories (be it from veg, chicken, pizza, protein shakes or chocolate!) you will not lose body fat. Simple. 

So today I'm back with my own favourite low calorie treats - things that I eat that will fit in with my calories and taste great. If you're counting macros you can easily scan your treat into your tracker (e.g. MyFitnessPal) in the morning and that way you've accounted for it and you can make it fit in with your daily calories. If having a small treat everyday helps you stick to your calories/macros goals - then why not? You will still see results...so happy days!  

 

 

1. Curly Wurly

A favourite of mine coming in at only 115 calories. Especially good when they are kept in the fridge. You can easily fit this into your day if you fancy a chocolate treat at night. This definitely won't break the calorie bank. In fact, I've been known to fit 2 of these into my macros /calories on any given day. 

 

oppo ice cream.png

2. Oppo ice-cream

A recent discovery of mine - I found them in Supervalue on the Abbeyleix road in Portlaoise - and if you're an ice-cream lover then look no further. I bought the salted caramel flavour - it is 100% unreal! And I've heard good things about the other flavours too. For half a tub of the salted caramel ice-cream it was about 190 calories - compare that to something like Ben n' Jerrys or the likes. Calories wise, Oppo, are a great option to have in the freezer. 

 

 

3. Aldi Whirlz

Another ice-cream option - a bit of a pattern here! :) These come in at  49 calories each. 

4. Jelly

These jellies are only 10 calories each. Great on their own or paired with something like Glenisk yogurt. Really can help curb a sweet craving if you've no major calories left. 

 

5. Mini trifles 

These mini trifles can be just the thing to hit that sweet craving. At 145 calories, they are not too hard on the macro front either! A handy thing to have in the fridge for those days when you just need something sweet.

And there you have it..a few of my favourite low calorie treats. Any ones I left out? Send me on your recommendations if you've made any good discoveries.

Nigel

 

 

 

Fats and Immune function

In this third and final installment of the role of macro-nutrients on the immune system, we are taking a look at the role dietary fat plays in immune response and function.

Fats are powerful mediators of the immune system, and they may modulate the immuno-suppressive effects of strenuous exercise. Dietary fat plays a role in some key functions in the body, which all contribute to immune function, namely:

  •  Hormone regulation and production, especially testosterone and oestrogen
  • Transport of the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K), to the liver for storage and utilisation.

Dietary fats play an important role in numerous physiological functions and therefore a low fat diet can pose health problems. Additionally, a low fat diet does not guarantee weight loss if calories aren’t appropriate.

Both the amount and type of fatty acids in the diet influence the growth and activity of immune cells. Proper functioning of the immune system depends on adequate amounts of each essential fatty acid.

Essential fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), are the precursors of substances that can promote or restrain inflammation. Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized in the body and thus, must be taken in via the diet. Essential fatty acids are intricately involved in the immune response, and regulate cytokines, which are released from immune cells in response to injury, infection, or exposure to foreign substances, as previously mentioned in our protein and immunity article. Amongst the fatty acids those from fish oil (EPA and DHA) are more biologically potent than alpha linolenic acid.

Studies in athletes have shown that a low-fat diet (15% of total calories), increases inflammatory and decreases anti-inflammatory immune factors, depresses antioxidants, and negatively affects blood lipoprotein ratios. A critical analysis of a large number of studies, demonstrated that there is a number of potential benefits to consuming unsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. This analysis showed that fatty acids play an important role in immune system regulation and may therefore be classified as holding the ability to modulate immune response. http://www.nature.com/icb/journal/v78/n1/full/icb20006a.html

Increasing your omega 3 intake (specifically EPA), and decreasing your omega 6 and saturated fat intake can have positive health effects and decrease inflammation. Omega 3 sources include salmon, mackerel, eggs and red meat. Omega 6 sources include sunflower oil, corn oil and safflower oil.

 

Foods: 
• Saturated Fats: Usually solid at room temperature and are primarily from animal sources, such as, dairy and other meats.
• Unsaturated Fats: Usually liquid at room temperature and can be further divided into mono and poly unsaturated fats.
• Mono-unsaturated fatty acids include: olive oil, avocado and peanut butter. 
 

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/10910295

https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256-200232050-00004

http://advances.nutrition.org/content/6/3/293S.full

http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v56/n3s/pdf/1601478a.pdf

 

 

My top 10 foods for micro-nutrients

When all is said and done, our health is the primary reason for eating good food.

We can get so caught up in counting macros, calories etc. that sometimes we don't think about the nutritional value of food. 

So with that in mind, I have compiled a list of MY top 10 foods (pretty hard to pick only 10!). I decided not to include any meats or fish on the list so that I could keep things simple - anyone who comes to the PFP knows how much I love my meat! The foods that I have picked are nutritional powerhouses, easily available and can be included in our daily diet. How many do you eat regularly?

1. Apples - great source of fiber, potassium and anti-oxidants. Also a good source of boron, which is a mineral with bone-building properties so aids with arthritis and osteoporosis prevention. 

2. Spinach - Low calorie and nutrient dense. High in potassium, magnesium, folate and iron among other vitamin and minerals. Can help to lower blood pressure and to keep skin and hair healthy. 

3. Onions - believed to have protective effects against stomach and esophageal cancer. Onions contain anti-oxidants and are anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibiotic - which will help to improve your immune system. The type of onion impacts on the health-promoting properties - the stronger the taste the more the potent the properties of it. 

4. Turmeric - also has natural anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. Very good for supporting any liver conditions.

5. Eggs (organic) - perfect source of protein. Make sure to include the yolk as the whole egg contains all nine essential amino acids. Contains choline which is vital for heart and brain health. Eggs provide decent amounts of vitamin B2, vitamin B12 and selenium. Best eaten poached or boiled and with a soft yolk. 

6. Nuts - raw nuts of any kind provide are great sources of fiber, anti-oxidants and vitamin E. Also important for heart health. 

7. Berries - berries are great sources of anti-oxidants and help to lower cholesterol levels. Believed to have protective properties against degenerative diseases. 

8. Sauerkraut - a big favourite of mine - but make sure it is truly fermented and not just a commercially processed impostor. The process of fermenting food creates 'live cultures' which have a tonne of health benefits such as feeding the good gut bacteria. A good balance of gut bacteria will result in improved digestion, absorption of nutrients and greater immune health. Sauerkraut is high in vitamin K and C as well as iron, potassium and calcium. Cabbage in itself has strong anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties while also being high in fiber and low in calories. 

9. Avocado  - high in mono-saturated fat which is believed to reduce the risk of both diabetes and cancer as well as being important for a healthy heart. Contains lutein which is important for eyes and skin. Great source of fiber, potassium and vitamin A. 

10. Raw milk / cream - raw, organic milk and cream are one of my favourite things to eat. Besides tasting great, raw dairy is full of vitamins A and D as well as calcium.  Raw milk is also high in omega 3s. It contains lots of healthy enzymes. Find raw milk here from Crawford's Farm with a list of stockists including the Fruit and Nut in Portlaoise. Even if you are lactose intolerant you may be able to tolerate raw milk with no issues so it's worth checking out. 

So there you have it - my top 10 foods (at the moment!) for micro-nutrients. 

What would you add in  / take out? I'd love to hear your thoughts and ideas.

Nigel